Thursday, December 9, 2010

Looking for a real Christmas tree?

Will you be going natural or artifical this year?

Natural Christmas trees are not only good for the environment, but in vogue. There are 4 basic types of trees sold at farms and nursuries:

1. Scotch pine- decent needle retention, but it requires plenty of pesticides
2. Balsam fir- soft needles, very aromatic
3. White spruce- excellent needle retention, but disagreeable odour when needles are crushed.
4. Fraser fir- pleasant scent and ultra-soft needles with good retention, but more expensive.

[ Christmas Trees ]

Lack of Rain is No Excuse Not To Install a Rain Barrel

Do you live in a dry area with drought-like conditions? I've heard many tell me that they don't install rain barrels because there's no rain to collect. But where there's a will to help the environment, there's always a way...

Homeowners that live in drought-like areas usually have air conditioners. And did you know that air conditioners are an untapped source for FREE water? Air conditioners produce a continuous supply of water condensate each and every day. All you really have to do is to disconnect the air conditioner condensate and connect it to a rain barrel. And voila! You are now recycling air conditioner condensate for use in your garden.

TIP OF THE DAY: Connect your air conditioner to a rain barrel for a free, everyday source of water for your garden.

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

Kale- the perfect cold-weather plant

This colorful plant thrives in cold weather!

I recently inherited several kale plants from a gardening trade show. So I decided to plant them in my front yard.
Not only is kale nature's super-food, but it's also pretty to look at... with the snow, it's the only plant left standing in my garden bed right now.

New Tumbling Composter

Check out this new tumbling composter! Nice!

Thursday, August 20, 2009

Economy turns gardening into growth industry

A poor economy has caused many Americans to stay at home. And with more Americans at home, the gardening industry is actually thriving!

"With the recession in full swing, many Americans are returning to their roots — literally — cultivating vegetables in their backyards to squeeze every penny out of their food budget." [ link ]